Page 36 - Aug2017

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36 |
GALVESTON MONTHLY |
AUGUST 2017
iSLAND lIFE |
bEACHCOMBING
The beachcombing community quickly
began tracking where the Lego pieces
were being found. Of course in the
beginning, most of the pieces were
found along Cornish beaches, but
as beachcombers over in the United
States learned of the incident, many of
them speculated that the Legos would
eventually begin washing up along the
east coast. Florida beachcombers were
eagerly scouring the beaches, hoping to
find the now-infamous Legos lost at sea.
My Personal Lego Story
Strangely, in twenty years I have not
heard of any of the Lost Legos washing
up in Florida. But in 2014, one of the
Lego octopus pieces was found by me—
in Galveston of all places. Since I planned
on attending the Sea-Bean Symposium,
an annual beachcombing fair, I decided
to take it to Florida to see if it was one of
the Lost Legos.
The octopus was examined by Curtis
Ebbesmeyer, a world-renowned
oceanographer who studies the tracking
of marine flotsam. He had been tracking
the Legos for over 15 years. As it turned
out, the octopus Lego that I found was
indeed presumed to be from the
Tokio
Express,
and it had taken seventeen years
to reach the beach in west Galveston.
Fromwhat I was told by Dr. Ebbesmeyer,
in order for my octopus to make it to
Galveston it most likely was tangled
with the sargassum in the Sargosso Sea
in the Atlantic, the original source of
the seaweed that washes up every year
along the Texas coast. It probably stayed
tangled there for many years. When the
sargassum broke apart from the Sargasso, it
simply made its way to Galveston, where I
happened to be picking up trash that day.
Twenty Years and Counting
Lego pieces continue to wash up on
Cornish beaches to this day, but in the
twenty years since the
Tokio Express
spill,
only a handful of the nearly five million
Legos have washed up in the United
States. A Facebook page was created
called Lego Lost at Sea, and the online
community of over 53,000 is dedicated
to finding all five million pieces. The page
features nearly daily updates on where
the pieces are being found.
The story of the Lost Legos continues to
be news in Cornwall England, and reports
have surfaced of a possible documentary
in the works.
To follow Lego Lost At Sea visit
www.Facebook.com/LegoLostAtSea
Octopus found on Galveston beach in 2014
Legos found along Cornish beaches
Lego sword found in beach debris
Boxes of found Legos
Images courtesy of Facebook.com/legolostatsea
Sword found in Portugual at Crismina Beach
gm