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GALVESTON MONTHLY |
JULY 2017
Houston-based Artists Seiyge Zellez (left) and Corathoa in front of their mural entitled,
On Sides Other
Coming Soon…
The next endeavor slated for the Galveston Kindness
Project is a 50-foot still-life mural that will grace the
mesh over the construction entrance of the Colonel
W.L. Moody Building at 22
nd
and Strand. It will be
produced by Gabriel Prusmack and promises to up the
ante even further toward the recognition of Galveston
as an arts destination.
“A lot of why I am promoting these art projects is to
make a way for these artists to be recognized,” says
Erin Toberman, leader of the GKP. “I asked Gabriel
what his dream project was, and he said to paint
the side of the Bank of America Building [at 22
nd
and
Market].” Thus Erin set about devising a plan as to
how to establish trust between the artist and the
community, and the black mesh covering the historic
building currently under restoration provided the
perfect canvas.
“It is temporary, but it is an opportunity create its own
conversation about art and the role it plays in our city,”
Erin says. “We want to be a port-of-call [for the cruise
ships], but first we have to establish that reputation.
We have to be known as a city of art.”
Seiyge Zellez and Corathoa,
On Sides Other
Known in the art world by the aliases Seiyge Zellez and Corathoa,
these two Houston-based artists founded The Isosceles Krew
in February of 2016. “Dedicated to having fun while promoting
acceptance, revelry, community, and individuality,” the Krew
specializes in outdoor events and exhibits that foster a social
gathering, all of which fit seamlessly into the 22
nd
Street Mural’s
purpose. In March of 2017, the Isosceles Krew was awarded
second place in the Houston Art Car Parade.
Invited to the project by Gabriel Prusmack, Seiyge’s longtime
friend, their quirky and mind-altering
On Sides Other
is a
wonderland on a wall, or rather on a snail. The piece is an
immersive experience that leads your curiosity up mysterious
staircases and down a trail lined with intriguing detail and hidden
treasures.
Inspired by the murals’ ability to help people self-identify with
art and promote it at the same time, Corathoa also sees how they
can foster a more fulfilling relationship with technology. “People
may be on their phone [taking selfies],” she says, “but at least
their phone is pointed to this moment, the present moment that
they’re in.”
Contact The Isosceles Krew at isosceleskrew@gmail.com,
281.433.6947, www.IsoscelesKrew.com.
gm