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This June, during Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, join the Alzheimer’s Association to help raise awareness of this
devastating disease. You can start by learning and sharing the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease.
It may be hard to know the difference between age-related changes and the first signs of Alzheimer’s. Some people may
recognize changes in themselves before anyone else notices. Other times, friends and family will be the first to observe changes
in memory, behavior or abilities.
To help identify problems early, the Alzheimer’s Association has created a list of warning signs for Alzheimer’s and other
dementias. Individuals may experience one or more of these in different degrees:
June is Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month
Know the 10 Signs
1.
Break a Sweat. Several studies
have found a direct link between
physical activity and increased
cognitive function. Engage
regularly in cardiovascular exercise
that raises your heart rate and
increases blood flow to the brain.
2.
Hit the Books. Any type of
education, whether formal or self-
prescribed, at any stage in life will
significantly reduce your risk of
dementia.
3.
Butt Out. Evidence suggests
that smoking increases the risk
of cognitive decline.
4.
Follow Your Heart. Take care
of your heart. Obesity,
high blood pressure, and
diabetes—all risk factors for
heart disease and stroke—
can also negatively impact the
brain.
5.
Watch Your Head. Wear a
seatbelt, use a helmet when
riding bikes or playing contact
sports, and take steps to prevent
falls in order to protect yourself
from brain injury, which can
increase the risk of dementia.
6.
Fuel Up Right. Eat a healthy
diet that is lower in fat and
higher in vegetables and fruit to
help decrease your risk of
cognitive decline.
7.
Catch Some Zzzzs.
Conditions such as insomnia and
sleep apnea can fatigue your
brain as well as your body,
resulting in problems with
memory and thinking.
8.
Buddy Up.
Engaging yourself socially
can support brain health, so
pursue social activities that
are meaningful to you.
9.
Stump Yourself. Challenge
your mind and activate your
brain. Open up your creative side
with something artistic or build
furniture.
10.
Take Care of Your Mental Health.
Some studies have shown that
a history of depression may be
linked with a decrease in cognitive
function. If you have anxiety, high
levels of stress, or symptoms of
depression, seek treatment.
1.
Memory loss that disrupts daily life.
2.
Challenges in planning or solving problems.
3.
Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure.
4.
Confusion with time or place.
5.
Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships.
6.
New problems with words in speaking or writing.
7.
Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps.
8.
Decreased or poor judgment.
9.
Withdrawal from work or social activities.
10.
Changes in mood and personality.
If you or someone you care about is experiencing any of these signs, please see a doctor to find the cause. Early diagnosis
gives you a chance to seek treatment and plan for your future.
Alzheimer’s disease is fatal and is the nation’s sixth leading cause of death. Join the fight for Alzheimer’s first survivor by
participating in the Galveston/Bay Area Walk to End Alzheimer’s on Saturday, October 14
th
at Stewart Beach Pavilion. The
Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support, and research.
Register today. Sign up as a Team Captain, join a team or register to walk as an individual at www.Alz.org/Walk.
Article submitted by Kathy VanDewalli, 2017 Chair – Bay Area/Galveston Walk to End Alzheimer’s. To learn more about Al-
zheimer’s disease, the warning signs or how to get involved, visit www.Alz.org or call the Alzheimer’s Association’s free
24-hour helpline at 800.272.3900.
10 WAYS TO LOVE YOUR BRAIN
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JUNE 2017