Page 24 - Oct2017

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around the island
By Christy Monroe
Downtown
Focus
New Faces and New Places
in downtown Galveston this month
Street Art:
A New Perspective
Street artists live by the motto, “Art and color is always better
than a blank wall.” Or in this case, a piece of wood, when
referring to the new installation at the corner of 22
nd
and Strand
Street.
“Color is joyful,” says Gabriel Prusmack, one of the featured
artists outside the former Colonel Bubbie’s Surplus Store, which
closed on Christmas Eve, 2014. Erin Toberman and Amy Owens,
owners of Clay Cup Studios, approached Keith Bassett, owner
of the building, after seeing the construction barrier walls.
They had an idea to fill the plywood walls with local art. As long
as the art work was to be done after 3pm, each day, in order
to ensure safety and access of the construction workers, the
project was green-lighted.
Well-known local aerosol artist Gabriel Prusmack started with
outlines and backgrounds on the standing plywood—that grew
into an elaborate and intricate work of art after others also
stepped in to add their style and flare. Adam Garrison was one
of the street artists who began to notice that the color on the
plywood and outlines were calling for more attention. He was
ecstatic to have the opportunity to work with his friend Gabe,
whom he has always looked up to as an inspiration in the art
community.
While adding his flavor and designs, Adam had pedestrians
stopping to ask questions. After a supply of brushes was
donated by Clay Cup Studios, he was able to invite those
curious onlookers to stop and paint with him. “It’s such a cool
feeling to have people walk by and know they might get a smile
on their face,” says Adam.
Local artist Justin Lopez contributed as well. Lopez worked
with Gabriel and Adam on the Kindness Mural at 22
nd
and
Postoffice, where he is known for his mysterious faces, which
are usually a tribute to his fiancé.
“When I see vivid colors, such as these, I almost want to eat it
but you can’t, so you look for more colors. The more places that
are colored, means less negative space which is better,” Gabriel
explains. With this project, he wanted to create more answers.
Images courtesy of Christy Monroe
24 |
GALVESTON MONTHLY |
OCTOBER 2017