Historic Homes


John D Rogers Mansion
Grandeur Lost - The John D Rogers Mansion
By Kathleen Maca

Many residents in the early days of Galveston had an impact on lives and businesses far beyond the shores of our Island. Determination, keen business sense, and love for family and community were often common threads in the lives that happened within the walls of Galveston’s lost mansions.


Osterman-Kopperl
From Cottage to Mansion - The Osterman-Kopperl Home
By Kathleen Maca

Out of all the lost mansions in Galveston, the colonial style home that once stood proudly at Twenty-fourth Street and Broadway may have had the most varied history on the island, evolving from the small cottage of a slave trader to the beautiful home of wealthy philanthropists, and eventually a gift to the community.


Osterman-Kopperl
Lost Mansions - Waters Davis Jr. Residence
By Kathleen Maca

Not all of Galveston’s lost mansions were Victorian or Colonial style homes. One in particular, the 1899 Waters Davis Jr. House, was quite modern in appearance even though it was constructed over one hundred years ago.


Kaufman-Ujffy
Kaufman-Ujffy Mansion - 1026 Avenue I
By Kathleen Maca

Julius Kauffman, Sr. (1815-1880) and his wife Clara Jockusch were German immigrants who found success after marrying in Galveston in 1851, bringing the lines of two prosperous families together. Kauffman was a dominant force in the business of providing a means of immigration for Germans from Bremen to Galveston. As consul to Austria and Hungary, he used his skills as an importer, merchant, and shipping agent as well as his overseas contacts to establish methods for new Americans to prepay for their European families to join them on the Island.


Powhatan
The Revival of the Powhatan - Avenue O & 35th
By Kathleen Maca

The newly reorganized Galveston Garden Club is dedicating efforts toward giving a new life to one of Galveston’s oldest homes. Stoically sitting on the corner of Avenue O and Thirty-fifth Street, the 1847 Sydnor-Powhatan House has fallen into disrepair and is the object of plans for a restoration.


Bradbury-Seinsheimer
Bradbury-Seinsheimer Mansion - 2425 Avenue K
By Kathleen Maca

One of Galveston’s finest homes was built for a woman who died before she could ever live within its walls. Despite its tragic beginning, the story of the residence would become as impressive as the structure itself.


Live Oak Terrace
Live Oak Terrace - 2518 Broadway
By ???

One of Galveston’s finest homes was built for a woman who died before she could ever live within its walls. Despite its tragic beginning, the story of the residence would become as impressive as the structure itself.


League Waters Moody
League-Waters-Moody Residence 1304 23rd Street
By ???

Over a century and a half ago, one of the finest homes on Galveston Island was built at the southeast corner of 23rd Street and Avenue M. Referred to for years by Galvestonians as the Waters House, the handsome, three-story structure was owned at different times by three of the most prominent men in the Island’s history.


Kenison Mansion
Kenison Mansion
By ???

When an imposing mansion owned by the Wood family was destroyed by fire in March 1886, only the wrought-iron fencing and prized oleanders that lined the surrounding sidewalks remained.


Oakleigh
Oakleigh: Lost Southern Elegance - 3112 Avenue O
By ???

Galveston’s private Artillery Club rests on the site of one of the Island’s most beloved mansions from the past. Referred to by the Library of Congress as the Brown-Denson-Moore House, the architectural gem housed even more families and stories than the title suggests.


Lasker
Lost Grandeur - The Lasker Mansion
By ???

Sometimes society has to make mistakes to learn from them. That was certainly the case with the demolition of the Morris Lasker House in the 1960s. The loss of this grand Galveston home acted as a catalyst for community members to step up to the challenge of preserving historical homes.


john Focke
The Lost Mansion of John Focke - 1228 Market Street
By ???

As many beautiful, historic homes as Galveston is proud to have dotting the island, some of the finest from the past are, sadly, lost. One of these was a spacious, three-story Victorian mansion in the east end of the city at 1228 Market. The home, which belonged to the family of Johann “John” Focke, was constructed in 1886.


Heidenheimer Castle
The Lost Heidenheimer Castle
By ???

It seems appropriate that Galveston’s fabled past includes a long lost castle. Heidenheimer Castle once sat on the northwest corner of Sixteenth Street and Sealy Avenue on the island’s prestigious East End.


Frosh-Conklin
The Frosh-Conklin Mansion
By ???

Materials for the three-story, eleven-room home, including ten massive columns, were brought to Galveston from Maine by schooner. It was known for its wide porches, beautiful grounds, and elegant landscaping.