Food & Drink


Aggie Winemaker
An Aggie Winemaker in Napa Valley
By Sandra Crittenden

Every year in France, Beaujolais Nouveau Day happens on the third Thursday in November with music festivals, fireworks, and lots of Beaujolais wine. Under French law, the new wine is released at 12:01am only a few weeks after the grapes are harvested. This year Beaujolais Day will be on November 19..


Schramsburg Vineyards
Wine Destination - Schramsberg Vineyards
By Sandra Crittenden

Hidden away inside a cave in Diamond Mountain in Calistoga, California, a sparkling treasure lies in wait for the perfect moment of release. The 34,000 square-foot cave can hold four million bottles, a liquid trove crafted in the traditional method of Champagne.


Sip Like a Sommelier
Sip Like A Sommelier - A Guide to Wine Tasting
By Sandra Crittenden

While most people enjoy drinking wine without any thought, the pleasure can be greatly enhanced by learning some of the rules of tasting that professionals use to discern the quality in their glass. While different sommelier associations have different wording or descriptors for their observations and conclusions, they all use three basic steps when evaluating a wine—Visual, Olfactory, and Taste.


Beaujolais
A Time For Beaujolais
By Sandra Crittenden

Every year in France, Beaujolais Nouveau Day happens on the third Thursday in November with music festivals, fireworks, and lots of Beaujolais wine. Under French law, the new wine is released at 12:01am only a few weeks after the grapes are harvested. This year Beaujolais Day will be on November 19..


Summer Sips
Summer Sips From Spain
By Sandra Crittenden

The Spanish wine story is long and begins far in the past before records were kept. The Phoenicians arrived there 3,000 years ago and found a developed and well-established wine culture with which to trade. The Romans would come and conquer and bring new techniques to help support the ever-expanding Roman thirst for the vino. After Rome fell, the Visigoth’s continued the viticulture tradition, but the Moors invaded in the 8th century and wreaked havoc on the industry with their ban on alcohol consumption.


Restocking Your Wine
The Tastes of an Independent America
By Sandra Crittenden

Colonial Americans drank alcoholic beverages roughly three times as much as modern Americans, primarily in the form of beer, cider, and whiskey. Apple trees were planted upon arrival in Plymouth and hard cider was being made by 1620.


Restocking Your Wine
Restocking Your Wine
By Sandra Crittenden

Now that we have lived through an unexpected closing down and reopening of life, having a well-stocked home seems more important than ever. For wine lovers, that means being supplied with more than just toilet paper and household cleaners.


Fall Creek Vineyards
Fall Creek Vineyards - 45 Years of Texas Wine
By Sandra Crittenden

Fall Creek is one of the oldest 100% Texas-grown and Texasmade wineries in the state. It is a quintessential stop when hitting the Texas Wine Trail whether in Driftwood, located outside of Austin, or at their original Tow, Texas location.


Italian Wines
Italian Wines - With Religious History
By Sandra Crittenden

Wine and Christianity have mingled together since the earliest of times, and the Easter season offers a good opportunity to explore some wines that have a religious story behind their creation. Religion largely discourages drunkenness, but religious scholars can find statements that view wine consumption both as sinful and as a gift that God has given to his followers to increase enjoyment of life on earth.


Rose All Day
Rose All Day
By Sandra Crittenden

While Provence may be the world leader in Rosé production, the style is also made in wine regions around the globe. Often thought of as cheap and cheerful, the production of pink vino may be more complex than expected, as the vinification process borrows from both red and white winemaking techniques and some varietals are even produced using more than one method.


Muffaletto
Mardi Gras Eats  - The Muffuletta
By Joseph R Pellerin

When thinking about Mardi Gras food, the first thing that probably comes to mind is King Cake. But the muffuletta sandwich is another uniquely New Orleanian food that is perfect for this season of revelry.


The Mysterious Mushroom
The Island Garden  - The Mysterious Mushroom
By Jan Brick

Wild or commercially grown, mushrooms are a fascinating plant life. Packed with antioxidants, mushrooms will lend an earthy, interesting flavor to everyday menus.


Gumbo
The Delicious Dichotomy of Gumbo
By Concetta Maceo

Gumbo is one of the most controversial topics of culinary discussion. Right down to the very meaning of the word, opposing ideologies maintain what is (or what should be) considered the right way to make gumbo. The dish, rooted in Louisiana culture, is reflective of America itself. What may seem like a straightforward recipe becomes a full-on representation of this country’s identity—a delicious melting pot of cultures stewed into one great dish.


Antipasto
Charcuterie Boards and Antipasto
By Concetta Maceo

When first seeing the word charcuterie, some people light up while others look puzzled trying to decipher how to even pronounce the word. But whether it is called charcuterie or antipasto, a meat and cheese board, or appetizer spread, one thing is for sure - it is delicious. The French and Italians have mastered the art and have been making these as a first course (or entrée) for centuries, but all that is needed to make a really great platter is a little balance and flow and lots of variety.